Jul 27

Getting Mindful: Taking The Time To Just Breathe

corinne

By: Corinne K.

We live in a world of instant gratification. With the world at our fingertips, it’s easy to assume that we can have everything yesterday and now. Along with that comes the tendency to rush through things. “I don’t have time for that.” “Hurry up, I don’t have all day.” “Time is money.” “Can we get this done any quicker?”

Now don’t get me wrong. I’m all for efficiency. There’s no point in wasting time on things that you know deep down will get you nowhere but what about slowing down in general?

On Thursday afternoon, we’re counting down to Friday night. When Friday night gets here, we laugh when we can’t even remember what we ate for breakfast that morning. We wonder, “where did the time go?”

Sometimes we can live in a blur, with moments passing us by as we routinely make it through our day and onto the next. The sun rises and sets without embracing the fact that another precious day has passed.

People on their death beds often look back and reflect on life and comment that they wish they spent more time doing the things they loved, spent more time with the people who meant the most to them. Do we really need to be on the brink of death to realize that life is fleeting? That a life lived doing the stuff we don’t want to do is just as bad as living for someone else? That the people who mean the most to us fill us up and we need each other to keep moving in the right direction?

When we slow down, we’re present to the moment. When we own the space we’re in, we’re living and not just going through the motions.

When we’re rushing to get through the day’s events, we’re often also stuck in our heads. It goes something like this: “Oh wow. I have so much to do today. How am I going to get all of this done? This is impossible. There’s no way this is going to happen.” So we cut corners, often the corners of the things that will help us cope with a piling to-do list. Like that breakfast we skipped this morning to make it out the door in time? That led to our sugar crash around 10am and made us pretty useless in the meeting we were rushing to get to. Oops. That backfired, huh?

We get stuck in our heads and pile anxious thought atop anxious thought. We see the world through the eyes of anxiety, pressure and time constraints. And guess what we get in return? Anxiety. Pressure. Time constraints. Like attracts like. It’s basic science.

So what can we do instead? It’s quite simple actually.

Just breeeeathe sloooowly. Try it now. Take a deep breath in. And exhale slowly. Be conscious of the fact that you’re a living being, breathing and alive.

Feel the air fill your lungs and slowly release it. And as you release the air, release the tension in your body. Do this a couple of times.

When those thoughts of your to-do list try to creep in as you concentrate on your breath, instead focus on your belly rising and falling with every breath. Try this whenever you feel the stress begin to creep in because you have too much to do. Try this when you feel like there’s not enough time in the day. Try this in bed before you even step foot to start your day.

The more often you take the time to just breathe, the more you’ll feel settled, grounded and relaxed. And just slow down. The world won’t fall apart if you take a little time to breathe. Promise.

Corinne K.

Bio PicCorinne K. works with stressed, busy and driven women. Through energy healing and soulful coaching, she helps them slow down and feel better physically and emotionally. She helps them get real about what they need to feel more free, inspired and empowered in life.

When she’s not working she’s probably sitting on a patio somewhere with a glass of wine or a London Fog, traveling or wandering the city. For more about what she does, check out corinnek.ca.

 

 

 

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Recipes, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jul 20

Drink Your Stress Away – A Relaxation Smoothie

 

drinkyourstressaway

Dr. Shannon Vander Doelen, ND

“You are what you eat” is how the saying goes – and while it may not be true in the literal sense, it should come as no surprise that what we eat can influence how we feel. In fact, our food choices can contribute to how stressed and anxious or how calm and relaxed we feel. This is largely related to our blood sugar levels. When we eat foods that are carbohydrate rich, processed, or lacking in protein or fibre, our blood sugar levels spike and then drop quickly, resulting in hypoglycaemia – a state that causes us to feel tired, irritable, shaky, and hungry (Hanger anyone?) In honour of #Relaxation Month at IHI, I wanted to share with you a smoothie recipe that is chalked full of ingredients that will help you to drink that stress away (in a good way!) It makes an awesome breakfast or snack since it’s rich in protein, fibre and healthy fats to help keep your blood sugar levels stable.

Recipe (Makes 1 large smoothie)

Ingredients

¼ cup frozen blueberries
¼ cup frozen mango
2 handfuls spinach
½ avocado
¼ cup steel cut oats
¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
1 scoop brown rice protein powder
½ cup unsweetened almond milk
½ cup water

Instructions

Place all ingredients in your blender and blend until smooth! Add more liquid or ice as needed to get your desired consistency. Relax, and enjoy!

How These Foods Calm You Down

Blueberries – contain fibre to balance blood sugar levels, contain vitamin C and the B vitamins to help reduce the impact of the stress hormone, cortisol, or our body and mind.

Mango – rich in vitamins C and B6, important for stress reduction and increased energy.

Spinach – contains fibre to balance blood sugar levels, rich in magnesium to promote a feeling of calm and help with muscle tension, contains B vitamins to help support adrenal gland function (the glands that release cortisol).

Avocado – contain fibre and monounsaturated fats to balance blood sugar levels, rich in folic acid and pantothenic acid (vitamins B9 and B5) that are important for cortisol regulation by the adrenal glands.

Oats – rich in fibre that stabilize blood sugar levels, B vitamins required for production of calming brain chemicals, and magnesium which helps promote physical and mental relaxation.

Yogurt – contains the good bacteria called probiotics, which have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety and depression by balancing chemicals in the brain called neurotransmitters.

Brown Rice – rich in tryptophan, the amino acid that increases serotonin and melatonin in the body resulting in a feeling of well-being and more restful sleep.

Almonds – rich in B vitamins and magnesium, which are two nutrients that are vital to our bodies ability to cope with stress.

Enjoy!

 

IMG_2905_2

Shannon will work with you to help you live your healthiest and happiest life. Since this means something different to everyone, she is excited about exploring your individual needs and working with you to create a treatment plan that is unique and sustainable for you and your busy lifestyle. Shannon is passionate about health and happiness and believes that the two go hand-in-hand.

Clinically, Shannon practices functional medicine. She maintains a general family practice, with a special interest in managing fatigue, stress, anxiety, and depression; digestive health; skin health; irregular or painful menstruation; and endocrine/hormonal disorders.

 

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Breakfast, Cold and Flu Prevention, Dairy Free, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Dinner, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Gluten Free, Green Beauty, Healthy Desserts, Hormonal Health, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Lunch, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Recipes, Smoothies, Snacks, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jul 13

How Can a Naturopathic Doctor Help with Infertility?

pregnant-bellyBy Dr. Jen Newell

I regularly see patients in my clinic seeking support for fertility challenges. This can be a frustrating, emotional and stressful process and it can be hard to ask for support. I have seen many women make incredible changes in their health and achieve a healthy, vibrant pregnancy. There are a number of ways in which a Naturopathic Doctor can support fertility and increase chances of natural conception and success with assisted reproductive technologies. Below are ways in which a I can help:

Time
Naturopathic Doctors have the privilege of having time to get to know their patients’ and their unique needs. With an initial visit of an hour and half, a Naturopath has the opportunity to understand the patient’s individual concerns and with appropriate follow-ups can devise a personalized treatment plan. Patient’s report feeling supported, understood and listened to, which can help to alleviate the stress often associated with trying to conceive.

Counseling
With the time given to understanding patients unique needs, Naturopathic Doctors are able to learn more about the emotional impact of trying to conceive and can address both physical and emotional concerns.

Holistic Practices
Naturopathic Doctors consider the whole body and lifestyle of a patient when creating an integrative treatment plan. Not only is fertility improved, but overall health is supported so often patients report more restorative sleep, improved digestive function and increased energy as a result of treatment.

Stress and Anxiety Management
Research into Naturopathic Medicine has found that seeing a Naturopath reduces stress for patients by 15-20%. Patients feel listened to and are able to discuss aspects of their care and lives to reduce perceived stress. Managing stress increases chances of successful conception. Naturopathic care is also helpful at reducing anxiety associated with fertility treatments.

Diet Counseling
Counseling patients to adopt a healthier diet improves overall health and supports fertility. Naturopathic Doctors are able to support patients in this transition and provide support for eliminating dependency on certain foods such as coffee and sugar. They are also able to identify and address nutrient deficiencies through diet and appropriate supplements.

What would you like to know next about fertility support?

Have an awesome day!

Dr. Jen Newell is passionate about helping people embrace health, feel amazing and easily incorporate “real” food into their busy lives. Her mission is to make health accessible and achievable, and to inspire patients to live an active, vibrant and healthy life.

Jen has a clinical focus on digestive health, food sensitivities and healthy nutrition; mental health and stress-related illness; women’s health, hormone balance and fertility; optimal aging; and dermatology. She focuses on integrating healthy foods into one’s diet in a medicinal and therapeutic capacity and providing individuals with nutritional support that is easy to incorporate into a busy day. Dr. Newell practices at the Integrative Health Institute in Downtown Toronto.

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Recipes, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jul 6

Does Effort = Results? (In The Gym)

gymfailBy Dr. Marc Bubbs, ND, CSCS

A common scenario I see with clients is that when they achieve poor results in the gym, they assume they are not training ‘hard enough’. They always think ‘lack of effort’ is the underlying cause of their training plateau, inability to lose weight, or failure to add lean muscle and size.

Does effort in the gym really translate into results?

I would say that most people in the gym, no matter what their level, are determined to get fitter, leaner, and healthier. You could even argue that the less fit you are, the more effort you often put in. I am not a skilled swimmer… I know I put forth a lot more effort into a 30 minute swim than my friends who used to swim in university. More effort, less results. What is going on here?

There are two general tendencies at play; genetics and a properly developed plan. Your genetics play a large role in your ability to lift heavy weights, perform in certain sports, and even lose weight. A recent article in Men’s Health highlights this point to a tee, some people are just born ‘bigger, stronger, faster!’

So, should you be taking advice from people – trainers, strength coaches, friends – whose genetic and hormonal profile predispose them to success? If you look at the hormonal profiles of top athletes, they all tend to fall into a certain category, a level above the rest of us.

The answer is no, you shouldn’t follow a personal trainer’s advice just because they are big or strong. But, if they have experience and expertise in their field and can outline  a safe and effective plan for you (with short-term, mid-term, and long-term goals) to help you achieve your goals… absolutely!

Effort only gets you so far. Most people don’t need to train more, they need to train smarter. Your training intensity (how hard you are working) as well as your training density (how much work you can do in a specific amount of time) are two critical factors for helping you achieve your goals of a better body and better performance.

You don’t need more hours in the gym… find the right plan and you can get better results in less time. For most people, this is the ultimate goal!

Have a great week,


Dr. Marc Bubbs, ND, CSCS,
  is a Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Author, Speaker, and Blogger practicing in Toronto, Canada. He believes that diet, exercise, and lifestyle factors have the most profound impact on your overall health and performance. Marc is the author of The Paleo Project – A 21st Guide to Looking Leaner, Getting Stronger, & Living Longer and currently serves as the Sports Nutrition Lead for Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team.
Dr. Marc Bubbs ND, CSCS

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Recipes, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 29

New Regulations for Naturopathic Doctors, and What That Means For You!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Ministry of health and long term care has made the official announcement, on July 1, 2015 the Naturopathic profession will move from operating under the Drugless Practitioners Act to the regulatory umbrella of the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 and the Naturopathy Act, 2007. As well, the College of Naturopaths of Ontario will now be in place to regulate the profession in the public interest.

This is an exciting advancement for our profession. With proclamation, Naturopathic Doctors are joining a community of nearly 300,000 health care professionals in Ontario who fall under the RHPA. Being an official part of this community will provide the opportunity for more integration and improved interdisciplinary care.

New regulation will also offer Naturopathic doctors the opportunity to obtain prescribing rights to a list of therapeutic substances including drugs like bio-identical hormones. Access to these substances is something our clients have been advocating for and will increase our ability to provide our clients with the best quality care. New regulations mean a new set of regulatory examinations. Our team is looking forward to the opportunity and will be working hard to complete all necessary examinations and so we can work with our clients to the full scope of our practice and their full health potential.

For our clients who receive Intravenous Micronutrient Therapy (IVMT), new regulation means that we will be working though some short term changes to our IV schedule. We will be working with our neighbours at Pace Pharmacy, who will be compounding our IV formulas. IV appointments will be available on Mondays from 2p-6p, Wednesdays from 10a-2p, and Fridays from 2p -6p. Our reception team will be contacting our IVMT clients with more information and will be happy to answer any questions you might have.

We sincerely thank all of our clients and community members who advocated to their MPP’s and the Ministry of Health to expand and maintain the Naturopathic scope of practice. Your letters and contributions have gone a long way to expand the proposed access to lab testing and therapeutic substances for Naturopathic clients. For that we are sincerely grateful.  We will continue to help our clients make empowered choices that support their values, in the pursuit of living an authentic healthy life.

Sincerely,

The IHI Team

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Recipes, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 22

Movility and Creativity

movilityblogpost

By Corinne K.

We’re often taught that having our nose to the grindstone is the best route to productivity. And while a strong work ethic is certainly an important factor in achieving success, sometimes the best thing we can do is move away from our work. New ideas and fresh perspectives will come easier when we can walk away and take a look at things from another angle.

Some of the world’s greatest minds understood the power of movement in getting their creative juices flowing. Rather than sit around, banging their heads against the wall when they got stuck on an idea, they knew that getting into their bodies was the best way to invoke their muse.

Steve Jobs was known for conducting his most important business meetings while walking with collaborators, crediting his greatest a-ha moments to these moving meetings. Darwin, Nietzsche, Dickens and Beethoven also found that their most creative moments came during their regular walks.

Getting into our bodies has been scientifically proven to increase creativity. A 2014 study published by the Journal of Experimental Psychology explored the level of creative thinking sparked by participants observed while sitting versus walking on a treadmill. The study concluded that walking increased creativity for 81% of participants while also increasing their creative output by an average of 60%. They also found that the thoughts that were generated by walking weren’t far-fetched or random but instead, were innovative and practical.

So what is it about walking that triggers our creativity? It all begins with the change to our chemistry as we begin to move. As we walk, our heart rate increases, circulating more blood and oxygen to the muscles and organs including the brain. Many experiments have shown that during and after exercise (even mild exertion) people will perform better on tests of memory and attention. Walking regularly also promotes new connections in the brain and helps slow the inevitable decline in brain tissue as we age.

When we’re stuck at our desks staring at a computer screen, hoping that inspiration strikes, we’re likely to find more of the same stagnation that we’re hoping to overcome.

Have you ever had the experience of desperately searching for something where you turn everything upside down? You search high and low only to find that what you’ve been looking for was right in front of you the whole time. It was staring right back at you but somehow you just didn’t see it. Typically we only see what we’re looking for right when we’re about to give up. When we’ve resigned ourselves that it’s lost forever – there it is. This is the point where we let go of the fixation of finding something.

This hindering fixation happens in other instances as well. It happens when we’re forcing an issue, trying desperately to fit it into a box of our understanding of something, even when it’s clear that we need to find another solution. This happens when we’re blocked creatively and stare at a blank page, canvas or computer screen and are trying to force a spark of inspiration.

The more we can get moving and walk away from these situations, the more we’ll find ease in our pursuits. So the next time you get stuck on something – stretch those legs and go for a walk instead! Allow the answers to come to you in a natural flow.

Corinne K.
Soul Healer. Change Catalyst.
Corinne works with stressed out, busy and driven women. She helps them slow down and feel better physically and emotionally. She guides them to get real about what they need to feel more free, inspired and empowered. Check out her website for more details and her June 2015 promotion.

w: www.corinnek.ca
e: hello@corinnek.ca
c: 416.844.0804

 

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 15

Confessions of a Naturopath: I hate working out.

stretching-498256_1280

By Dr. Shannon Vander Doelen, ND

In honour of MOVILITY month at IHI, I have a confession to make – I hate working out. Yes you read that right – I’m a naturopathic doctor that hates working out. In high school I played on a number of sports teams and worked part time as a lifeguard and swimming instructor – I was a pretty active teenager! Off to university I went, and the concept of “going to the gym” was introduced to me. Every semester I paid for the membership that allowed me access to the weight/cardio rooms and classes (Oh, the classes! They sounded so fun!) And every semester I would learn after a week or two that I had wasted my money (and in my 4 years at Guelph I think I went to just 4 Zumba classes). I spent 8 years in post-secondary education going through mostly the same drill – buying gym memberships, trying to get myself to go work out, and being disappointed in myself when I didn’t follow through on my expectations. By the end of Naturopathic College, I wasn’t in the best shape, and what was worst is that I was feeling pretty lousy about it. How was I supposed to go out into the world and tell people that they should be exercising when I couldn’t even commit to it myself? Fast-forward to today – and I believe I’m in the best shape of my life. What’s changed? I stopped worrying about working out and just started moving.

I have tried to be as open minded as I can to trying new things – I have learned to play squash and tennis, I started riding my bike again (something I hadn’t done much of since high school) and despite being a bit nervous, I use it as my main mode of transportation around the city. I regularly go for walks with my husband, friends or family. We explore new neighbourhoods and parts of the city that we’ve never been to. This summer I’m playing on a softball team, and I’m hoping to get out of the city a few times to hike, swim, canoe, and experience nature in cottage country. I also use the gym in my condo from time to time when the weather isn’t cooperating or I feel like I just want to move my body! To me, not one of these things ever feels like working out, but the benefits to my physical and mental health would tell you that they are. The pros of movement are no secret to any of us – we’ve talked lots about them on this blog in fact. But what I’ve come to realize is that movement, in any form, is what I want to preach to my patients. Yes, this might take you a bit out of your comfort zone, but that’s where all the change happens! I know it can be challenging, intimidating, and downright scary. To help you get started, here are my top 5 tips for incorporating movement into your life.

  1. Do something you enjoy. Maybe you love classes at the gym, awesome! But remember that it’s okay if you don’t. Did you use to play a sport or do an activity as a teen that you enjoyed? Is there something you’ve always wanted to try? I can almost guarantee that there are other adults out there doing it too and would be happy to have you join them. (Also, don’t get me wrong, I love a good Zumba class. My sister is even a Zumba instructor, family dinners can get a little rowdy.)
  2. Add it in to your routine. There are things that you do every day right? Think about how you can incorporate a bit of movement into some of the tasks you are already doing on a regular basis. Get off the subway a stop sooner, park your car in the back of the parking lot, stand up and walk around each time you are on the phone, do wall or counter push ups when you are waiting for your coffee to brew, or do some squats during each commercial on TV. Every little bit counts.
  3. Move everyday. Sometimes this might take a bit of forethought, particularly during busy times. I often suggest to those who work a desk job to set an alarm on their phone to go off every hour to remind them to get up and move. Go to the washroom, grab a glass of water, do a loop around your office, or go up one or two flights of stairs and back down. There is a great video by Dr. Mike Evans from the University of Toronto who pleads of us all to limit our sitting to just 23 ½ hours per day – do you think you can do it?
  4. Think about function instead of the number on the scale. I view movement as more than just losing weight or achieving a certain figure. Movement, and in particular functional movement, is going to allow our bodies to remain active for longer. Whole body movement rather than isolated muscle strengthening is best for increasing our lean muscle mass and decreasing our fat mass, thus improving body composition, allowing us to move pain-free, and gives us the ability to move independently despite aging (think about things like getting in and out of a chair, or climbing up stairs).
  5. Get yourself a coach or cheerleader. If you are looking to move more but don’t know where to start, consider taking a lesson, joining a class, or finding a friend to help support you! There are lots of cool apps you can download that also guide you through how to move and coach you to keep going when you feel like giving up. Sometimes there is something else going on that is preventing us from moving – pain, injury, fatigue and even our mood can stop us in our tracks despite our best intentions. Your Naturopathic Doctor can also be a great help, and can give you individualized support to achieve your goals.

In honour of Movility, what steps are you going to take to move more? I’m looking forward to hearing from all of you!

 

IMG_2905_2Shannon will work with you to help you live your healthiest and happiest life. Since this means something different to everyone, she is excited about exploring your individual needs and working with you to create a treatment plan that is unique and sustainable for you and your busy lifestyle. Shannon is passionate about health and happiness and believes that the two go hand-in-hand.

Clinically, Shannon practices functional medicine. She maintains a general family practice, with a special interest in managing fatigue, stress, anxiety, and depression; digestive health; skin health; irregular or painful menstruation; and endocrine/hormonal disorders.

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, Hypoallergenic, IV Therapy, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Recipes, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 15

Movility Turmeric Latte

Movility-Turmeric-Latte-page-001

 

Ingredient benefits:

Turmeric:

  • Mediates chronic inflammation. Inflammation can trigger metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes
  • Curcumin can prevent fat deposition and promotes fat burning

Hemp seeds:

  • Reduce appetite
  • Provide fats and proteins to reduce cravings to sweets and carbs
  • GLA (an essential fatty acid) activates metabolism and encourages the use of stored fat for energy

Cinnamon:

  • Supports balances blood sugar values
  • Reduces inflammation

Ginger:

  • Promotes optimal digestion
  • Thermogenic effect promotes fat loss and also boosts metabolism

Protein:

  • Promotes muscle growth and development and improves body composition

Have an awesome day!

 

Dr. Jen Newell is passionate about helping people embrace health, feel amazing and easily incorporate “real” food into their busy lives. Her mission is to make health accessible and achievable, and to inspire patients to live an active, vibrant and healthy life.

Jen has a clinical focus on digestive health, food sensitivities and healthy nutrition; mental health and stress-related illness; women’s health, hormone balance and fertility; optimal aging; and dermatology. She focuses on integrating healthy foods into one’s diet in a medicinal and therapeutic capacity and providing individuals with nutritional support that is easy to incorporate into a busy day. Dr. Newell practices at the Integrative Health Institute in Downtown Toronto.

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Breakfast, Digestive Health, Dinner, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Healthy Desserts, Hormonal Health, love, Lunch, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Recipes, Smoothies, Snacks, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 8

Exercise – The Best ‘Pill’ You Can Take!

Marathon runners on the run in city

By Dr Marc Bubbs, ND, CSCS

The idea that exercise is the best ‘pill’ you’ll ever take to promote a healthy heart and blood vessels is consequently gathering steam in the medical community.  World leaders in cardiovascular medicine gathered last summer at the 2010 European Society of Cardiology Congress Conference in Stockholm, Sweden.  The main topic of discussion was the impact that moderateexercise can have on not only preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) but reversing CVD in patients with existing damage.  This is a profound statement as according to the American Heart Association we currently spend 475 million dollars annually treating CVD. The scientific data presented supports the notion of exercise as a ‘first line’ therapeutic medical intervention – not just a token preventative option – for patients with cardiovascular disease.

A very interesting study at the Conference entitled “Exercise: from leisure activity to therapeutic option,” was presented by Dr. Denis Clement, highlighting the relationship between low peak VO2 and poor prognosis in post-myocardial infarction – or post-heart attack – patient outcomes.  These results outline the relationship between poor aerobic fitness and poor outcomes after heart attacks.  His investigative group concluded that aerobic exercise should be a ‘first line’ therapeutic option when treating CVD patients.  That is to say Dr Clement’s medical team view exercise as the most important treatment option for cardiovascular patients due to its overwhelming positive impact on cardiovascular health.   His team has also seen benefits using interval aerobic training on Metabolic Syndrome or Syndrome X, a growing epidemic in North America.  Metabolic syndrome is defined as a combination of elevated triglycerides, elevated blood pressure, elevated blood sugar or insulin levels, decreased HDL or ‘good’ cholesterol, and increased body fat levels or body mass index (BMI).  Dr. Clement’s preliminary work shows the power that one single intervention – interval aerobic training – can have on changing all five disease-markers!  Not even the best drug in the world can have this wide reaching beneficial impact.

Another study presented in Stockholm, by Dr Francois Carre, discussed the beneficial impact that weight training can have on cardiovascular health.  Dr Carre, an expert anesthesiologist, believes that properly executed weight training targeting large muscle groups has a multitude of profound heart healthy benefits.  His team’s research observed positive correlations between increased strength and improved cardiovascular health. This is incredible evidence that weight training can prevent cardiovascular degeneration and drastically reduce the incidence of CVD. Dr Carre’s reserach  demonstrates that the benefits of exercise far outweigh the risks for CVD patients, however he does suggests patients be evaluated by a physician first before starting a new exercise regime and be given a personalized program to maximize their results.

We often think if we are not losing weight after hours of training at the gym that we are not getting results, that our efforts are inconsequential.  The studies presented at the Cardiology Conference in Stockholm tell a different story.  They provide gold-standard scientific evidence that exercise is improving the structure and function of your heart and blood vessels, setting up the foundation for optimal health.   Dr Rainer Rauramaa of the Finish Institute of Exercise further supports the use of resistance training as a therapeutic tool.  He has stated…” that moderate resistance training exercise should be considered the ‘cornerstone in the treatment of hypertension’. He made this conclusion after presenting research highlighting the positive impact of moderate resistance training on blood pressure and vascular disease.  His investigative team discovered “a clear anti-atherosclerotic effect” – or plaque reducing effect – in blood vessels due to strength training, regardless of whether or not the patient lost weight. This point is especially important. Even if you don’t lose any weight in the gym, you are improving your cardiovascaular health tremendously, and fighting off degeneration and disease.  Best of all, there are no negative side-effects! Actually, one could say the side-effects of resistance training are increased energy, vitality, immune and digestive function, and better sleep! Sounds like something we all could use a little bit more of.

The overwhelming message from the Cardiology Conference was that traditional drug therapy is really only a ‘palliative’ or ‘band-aid’ therapy and did not address the underlying causes of the disease.  Dr Rainer Hambrecht of Germany was so impressed with the results of his study that he concluded, “I would be happy if I could convince everybody with coronary artery disease to participate in a moderate exercise program.” He presented material highlighting the positive impact that 12 months of exercise had on myocardial perfusion – or blood supply to heart muscles – and the symptom relief it gives patients suffering from angina or chest pain.  His data showed that exercise was just as good as the leading cardiovascular drug on patient outcomes.  However, exercise was the only thing that improved endothelial function and slowed the progression of disease, due to its holistic and overall impact on the body.  This is a profound testimonial to the powerful positive impact of exercise on heart health.

Get started on an individualized heart healthy protocol of exercise, diet and supplementation. Need help getting started? Contact us today to find out more.


Dr. Marc Bubbs, ND, CSCS,
  is a Naturopathic Doctor, Strength Coach, Author, Speaker, and Blogger practicing in Toronto, Canada. He believes that diet, exercise, and lifestyle factors have the most profound impact on your overall health and performance. Marc is the author of The Paleo Project – A 21st Guide to Looking Leaner, Getting Stronger, & Living Longer and currently serves as the Sports Nutrition Lead for Canadian Men’s Olympic Basketball Team.
Dr. Marc Bubbs ND, CSCS

 

References:

1)     Clement DL. Treatment of hypertension in patients with peripheral arterial disease: an update. Curr Hypertens Rep. 2009 Aug;11(4):271-6. Review.

2)     American Heart Associtation, [www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4475] Jan 2010

3)     Corra U, Carre F et al.  Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation. Eur Heart J. 2010 Aug;31(16):1967-74. Epub 2010 Jul 19.

4)     Laukkanen JA, Mäkikallio TH, Rauramaa R, Kurl S.  Asymptomatic ST-segment depression during exercise testing and the risk of sudden cardiac death in middle-aged men: a population-based follow-up study. Eur Heart J. 2009 Mar;30(5):558-65. Epub 2009 Jan 23.

5)     Clement, DL. “Hypertension and Peripheral Disease”.  2010 European Society of Cardiology Congress in Stockholm, Sweden.

6)     Carre, DL. “Exercise Modalities for Cardiovascular Patients”.  2010 European Society of Cardiology Congress in Stockholm, Sweden.

7)     Hambrecht, R. “Training Away Angina”. 2010 European Society of Cardiology Congress in Stockholm, Sweden.

8)     Rauramaa, R. “ Exercise As Treatment Option for Hypertension.” 2010 European Society of Cardiology Congress in Stockholm, Sweden.

9)     Gielen S, Hambrecht R, Schuler GC.  Commentary on Viewpoint: Exercise and cardiovascular risk reduction: time to update the rationale for exercise? J Appl Physiol. 2008 Aug;105(2):771.

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Ayurveda, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Environmental Medicine, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Pain Management, Sports Medicine, Uncategorized, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Jun 1

Pilates: An Approach to Movement

DSC00484

By Yvette Marcek

Pilates: An Approach to Movement

I have a well seasoned client at the age of 63 who has a great sense of humour and an attitude to match. Over the last few years he’s gone through two knee replacements. He travels the world and travels around Toronto, either walking, cycling, or on the TTC, and keeps further active and well, with some moderate strength training at the gym. He’s far from being pain free, but you can’t keep him still. He says to me, “listen Yvette, motion is lotion.” This gentleman’s daughter is a professional dancer – this is her mantra, and the mantra of all her dance friends. What’s your ‘lotion’? Pilates is one of my favourite ‘lotions’, because that’s what it feels like. Am I right Pilates fans?

Physical movement is vital for our wellbeing: not only physically, but also mentally and emotionally. Maybe you’re already hitting the gym, an avid runner, doing yoga, playing a sport, running after your kids, dancing, walking, cycling, or taking care of your household. Or maybe you used to be active, and you’d desperately love to get some activity back into your life. Or maybe you haven’t ever done much physical activity in the past, but you are ready to give it a try. Whatever stage you’re at, Pilates has a place. Yes, even if you have no history of physical activity. The main goal is just to get moving because Pilates has many modifications that are adapted to each person’s ability.

Pilates is more than a series of exercises. It’s an exercise practice and an approach to movement. It isn’t meant to be the only thing you do, rather a foundation to do everything else better, from sitting to the flying trapeze. The exercises have various therapeutic targets. For example muscle activation, joint mobilization, stabilizing challenges, sequencing, coordination and endurance objectives. The main purpose of Pilates is to restore optimal function to the body by focusing on the core stabilizers which provide support to your body’s center. This is your source of power, balance and movement. The ultimate goal is then to integrate core strength with flexible limbs and joints, not only on the mat, but transferring into your day to day life. With your increased body awareness, you will gain a better understanding of how your body moves and shakes, fostering a sense of connection with your body, and nurturing your mind/body relationship, so you can consciously move throughout the day with better overall support for your precious body. As Joseph Pilates says, “it’s the mind itself which shapes the body.” Instead of being an exercise regime that you simply follow along, it’s an intelligent way to exercise and it is great lotion for motion.

 

Integrative-017-199x300Yvette Marcek is a Registered Massage Therapist, Pilates Practitioner and Reiki Practitioner; she often incorporates each of these modalities with her clients. Recognizing that each person who comes in the treatment room has unique requirements and goals, her priority is to create a therapeutic environment that is safe, healing, and positive.

Despite viewing laughter as the best form of medicine, Yvette sees the healing of massage therapy and touch as an international language, spoken without barriers and greatly benefiting anyone. She is particularly passionate about increasing body awareness, believing that consciousness of our physical body and the world around us is an integral part of maintaining our health and happiness.

You can email Yvette for more info on her Pilates classes, Reiki or her RMT practice here

Print Friendly
Posted in Autoimmune, Cold and Flu Prevention, Detoxification, Digestive Health, Fatigue, Green Beauty, Hormonal Health, love, Massage Therapy, Mind-Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Pain Management, Pilates, Pregnancy, Sports Medicine, Women's Health, Yoga | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment